CRIJ 270 Criminology

This course is designed to inform students about the scientific study of crime and criminals. The following topics will be covered: defining and measuring crime, contemporary crime patterns and correlates, types of crime, and theories of criminal behavior. Students will also be exposed to various myths and misperceptions about crime and criminals.

Credits

3 Credits

CRIJ 270Criminology

Please note: This is not a course syllabus. A course syllabus is unique to a particular section of a course by instructor. This curriculum guide provides general information about a course.

I. General Information

Department

Social Science

II. Course Specification

Course Type

Program Requirement

Credit Hours Narrative

3 Credits

Semester Contact Hours Lecture

48

Grading Method

Letter grade

Repeatable

N

III. Catalog Course Description

This course is designed to inform students about the scientific study of crime and criminals. The following topics will be covered: defining and measuring crime, contemporary crime patterns and correlates, types of crime, and theories of criminal behavior. Students will also be exposed to various myths and misperceptions about crime and criminals.

IV. Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, a student will be able to:

Define criminology as a field of study. Summarize and explain crime and deviance. Explain the evolving science of criminology. Define and explain evidence-based criminology. Explain and distinguish the Classical and Neoclassical schools of criminological thought. Describe and compare the biological theories as they relate to criminal causation. Describe and compare the psychological and psychiatric schools of criminal behavior. Describe and compare the social structure theories in regard to criminal causation. Describe and compare the social process and social development theories in relation to criminal behavior. Describe and compare the social conflict theories of criminal causation. Identify and define the various crimes against persons. Evaluate crime rates and crime reporting methodologies in regard to the crimes against persons. Identify and define the various crimes against property. Evaluate crime rates and crime reporting methodologies in regard to crimes against property. Define and explain the various types of white-collar crime and organized crime. Describe the causes of white-collar and organized crime. Examine the historical development of drug crimes and crimes against public order. Explain how technology has impacted crime and law enforcement activities. Summarize the impact of globalization and terrorism on law enforcement operations.

V. Topical Outline (Course Content)

What is Criminology Where Do Theories Come From? Classical and Neoclassical Thought Biological Roots of Criminal Behavior Psychological and Psychiatric Foundations of Criminal Behavior Social Structure Theories Theories of Social Process and Social Development Social Conflict Theories Crimes Against Persons Crimes Against Property White-collar and Organized Crime Public Order and Drug Crimes Technology and Crime Globalization and Terrorism

VI. Delivery Methodologies

Required Assignments

Participation in classroom discussion and activity Chapter readings and written summaries of main topics

Required Exams

Chapter Quizzes Unit Exams

Required Text

Criminology Today, By Frank Schmalleger (6th Edition, Prentice Hall)

Specific Course Activity Assignment or Assessment Requirements

Participation in classroom discussion and activity Chapter readings and written summaries of main topics Chapter Quizzes Unit Exams