POLS 221 Intro to International Relations

This is a basic international relations course that explores the primary causes that maintain or destroy international peace and cooperation.

Credits

3

General Education Competency

GEM Social and Behavioral Ways of Knowing

POLS 221Intro to International Relations

Please note: This is not a course syllabus. A course syllabus is unique to a particular section of a course by instructor. This curriculum guide provides general information about a course.

I. General Information

Department

Social Science

II. Course Specification

Course Type

General Education

General Education Competency

GEM Social and Behavioral Ways of Knowing

Credit Hours Narrative

3

Semester Contact Hours Lecture

45

Grading Method

Letter grade

Repeatable

N

III. Catalog Course Description

This is a basic international relations course that explores the primary causes that maintain or destroy international peace and cooperation.

IV. Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, a student will be able to:

Demonstrate comprehension of international political theories, institutions and processes. Demonstrate the ability to think, integrate, and logically organize, not just memorize, political information. Be able to gather knowledge from other disciplines to interpret political situations and put it to use in class work. Demonstrate the ability to apply insights from the study of political science to understand local, state, national and international developments.

V. Topical Outline (Course Content)

Theoretical underpinnings of why humans create governments and theories of collective action. Exploration of the anarchy of the international system. Major theories of International Relations including Realism, Liberalism, Constructivism. War and Conflict—theories of why war occurs, domestic politics and war, international institutions and war, non-state violence/terrorism. International Political Economy—trade policy, financial relations, monetary relations, theories of development/causes of wealth and poverty. Transnational politics—international law and norms, human rights, climate/environmental policy, future of international system.

VI. Delivery Methodologies

Required Assignments

None

Required Exams

Final Exam

Required Text

Frieden, Lake and Shultz "World Politics" Drezner "Theories of International Politics and Zombies" Acemoglu and Robinson "Why Nations Fail"

Specific Course Activity Assignment or Assessment Requirements

None Final Exam