ARTS 225 Ceramics 1

This course is an introduction to basic processes of ceramics and the operation of the CSI ceramics lab.  Ceramics 1 includes handbuilding, throwing, and firing.

Credits

3 Credits

ARTS 225Ceramics 1

Please note: This is not a course syllabus. A course syllabus is unique to a particular section of a course by instructor. This curriculum guide provides general information about a course.

I. General Information

Department

Visual and Performing Art

II. Course Specification

Course Type

Program Requirement

Credit Hours Narrative

3 Credits

Semester Contact Hours Lecture

45

Grading Method

Letter grade

Repeatable

N

III. Catalog Course Description

This course is an introduction to basic processes of ceramics and the operation of the CSI ceramics lab.  Ceramics 1 includes handbuilding, throwing, and firing.

IV. Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, a student will be able to:

Make ceramic objects, using a variety of constructing techniques . Much of this first year of instruction ( Ceramics 1 plus Ceramics 2) introduces forming methods which include pinch, coil and slab techniques, as well as making pots on the wheel. Glazing, decorating, and firing ceramic objects takes many repetitions. Two semesters of work is necessary for assimilation of the many nuanced skills needed to make college level work.

V. Topical Outline (Course Content)

In each semester -long ceramics class 15 objects are assigned. Class lessons and personal coaching might include discussions of techniques, creative methods, formal criticism, and expression.

VI. Delivery Methodologies

Required Exams

Two major group critiques will bring work together for evaluation and problem solving Productivity, innovation and craftsmanship are valued. The intension is not for each student to leave with the same catalogue of objects. Final critiques each semester are mandatory meetings at which students assemble completed portfolios of finished work.

Specific Course Activity Assignment or Assessment Requirements

Two major group critiques will bring work together for evaluation and problem solving Productivity, innovation and craftsmanship are valued. The intension is not for each student to leave with the same catalogue of objects. Final critiques each semester are mandatory meetings at which students assemble completed portfolios of finished work.