CISG 105 Survey of Graphic Design

The Survey of Graphic Design (CISG 105) course is an exploration of the history, elements, principles, and effects of design, and how they are applied on the digital platform in raster and vector formats. The role of graphic designers as purveyors of unified visual communications is examined. Students use digital media to solve a variety of visual problems and communicate a clear, complete visual message.

Credits

3 Credits

CISG 105Survey of Graphic Design

Please note: This is not a course syllabus. A course syllabus is unique to a particular section of a course by instructor. This curriculum guide provides general information about a course.

I. General Information

Department

Information Technology

II. Course Specification

Course Type

Program Requirement

Credit Hours Narrative

3 Credits

Semester Contact Hours Lecture

30

Grading Method

Letter grade

Repeatable

N

III. Catalog Course Description

The Survey of Graphic Design (CISG 105) course is an exploration of the history, elements, principles, and effects of design, and how they are applied on the digital platform in raster and vector formats. The role of graphic designers as purveyors of unified visual communications is examined. Students use digital media to solve a variety of visual problems and communicate a clear, complete visual message.

IV. Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, a student will be able to:

Outcome 1: Students will draw in their sketchbooks practice sketches to develop their skills and understanding of the elements of design (line, shape,space, texture, value, color). Assessment 1: Students will submit their sketchbooks on a regular basis to the instructor for grading and commentary. Outcome 2: Students will explore, investigate, research, and write short essays about topics discussed in class that are relevant to graphic design, as assigned by the instructor. Assessment 2: Students will submit typed essays to the instructor for evaluation and commentary. Outcome 3: Students will brainstorm for ideas and create thumbnail drawings and roughs in their sketchbooks in preparation for producing the completed design project in Outcome 4. Assessment 3: Students will submit the sketchbook to the instructor for grading and commentary. Outcome 4: Students will use computer graphic design software, combining type and graphics, to create a simple postcard incorporating appropriate organizational schemes and proportional models. Assessment 4: Students will submit the final printed piece to the instructor for grading based on a rubric, and will present the piece to their peers in a critique. Outcome 5: Students will demonstrate that they are knowledgeable and conversant in graphic design history, theory and principles as taught during lectures and teacher demonstrations. Assessment 5: Written quizzes and the final examination.

V. Topical Outline (Course Content)

Define graphic design as a means of communicating a clear message by creating solutions to visual problems. Define and identify the different categories of graphic design and their purposes. Identify major movements and significant historical periods in graphic design history. Demonstrate an understanding of the elements and principles of design through simple drawings. Define and distinguish between design ideas and design concepts. Demonstrate an understanding of the creative process from brainstorming through final concept. Define, identify and be conversant in terms relating to computer-generated graphics (i.e., raster/vector). Define, identify, and be conversant in computer software used in the graphic design industry. Demonstrate an understanding of basic typographic design. Demonstrate an understanding of organizational schemes, proportional layout models, and use of grids. Use elements, principles and effects of design to synthesize typography and images into a simple layout. Converse intelligently about and evaluate graphic designs through organized critiques. Define, identify, and be conversant in portfolio style selection, assembly and presentation.

VI. Delivery Methodologies

Required Text

Text: Guide to Graphic Design, by Scott W. Santoro (Pearson, 2014); ISBN 10:0-13-230070-2; ISBN 13: 978-0-13-230070-4

Required Materials

Standard 8.5 x 11 notebook and note-taking pen; 8.5 x 11 inch hard cover spiral-bound sketchbook with no-lined pages; Drawing pencils (hardnesses ranging from 8B thru 2H); Color pencils (student choice as to brand; need at least 24 colors); Kneaded eraser and white plastic art eraser. A ruler, protractor, and compass. Access to a computer with a word processor and color printer outside of class; Portable sharpener (for graphite and colored pencils) Good walking shoes, an occasional belt (as worn with trousers), reliable jacket Your mind, your eyes, your imagination.