ECON 202 Principles of Microeconomics

Principles of governing production, price relationships, and income distribution and their application to selected problems.

Credits

3 Credits

General Education Competency

GEM Social and Behavioral Ways of Knowing

ECON 202Principles of Microeconomics

Please note: This is not a course syllabus. A course syllabus is unique to a particular section of a course by instructor. This curriculum guide provides general information about a course.

I. General Information

Department

Business & Economics

II. Course Specification

Course Type

General Education

General Education Competency

GEM Social and Behavioral Ways of Knowing

Credit Hours Narrative

3 Credits

Semester Contact Hours Lecture

50

Semester Contact Hours Lab

0

Semester Contact Hours Clinical

0

Grading Method

Letter grade

Repeatable

N

III. Catalog Course Description

Principles of governing production, price relationships, and income distribution and their application to selected problems.

IV. Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, a student will be able to:

Communication Communicate economic concepts both verbally and visually using economic graphing tools. Problem Solving/Analysis Calculate, analyze and interpret: Key Economic Models (Supply and Demand, Production Possibilities, Circular Flow, etc.) Economic Tools and Indicators (Elasticity, Economic Profits/Costs, etc.) Major Types of Competition Current Economic Issues (Wages, Immigration, etc.). Identify relationships between indicators and economic tools and economic trends; identify appropriate economic policies. Apply economic reasoning in both personal and business decisions. Effective Performance Participate in the learning process, become more fluent in economics, and utilize economic reasoning in decision-making. Pursuit of Personal Goals Apply economic reasoning in both personal and business decisions. Global Perspective Communicate the relevancy and applicability of economic concepts using a global business perspective.

V. Topical Outline (Course Content)

The course consists of three units, each with its own exam, as well as a team project as a class final (see Section VI): Unit 1: Chapter 1: Limits, Alternatives, and Choices Chapter 2: The Market System and the Circular Flow Chapter 3: Demand, Supply, and Market Equilibrium Unit 2: Chapter 6: Elasticity Chapter 7: Utility Maximization (optional) Chapter 9: Businesses and the Costs of Production Unit 3: Chapter 10: Pure Competition in the Short Run Chapter 11: Pure Competition in the Long Run Chapter 12: Pure Monopoly Chapter 13: Monopolistic Competition and Oligopoly Unit 4: Chapter 15: Wage Determination Chapter 19: Antitrust Policy and Regulation Chapter 20: Agriculture: Economics and Policy Chapter 21: Income Inequality, Poverty, and Discrimination Chapter 23: Immigration

VI. Delivery Methodologies

Required Assignments

Journals/Quizzes There are a total of fifteen journals/quizzes throughout the semester. The journals may be a response to an article, exercises from the text, or assignment on any topic related to the course. Quizzes are based upon information covered in each respective chapter. Term Paper or Guest Speaker Paper Students are required to either write a term paper in response to an economic article or attend a guest speaker and write a paper on how they were able to apply economic concepts to what was discussed.

Required Exams

Exams There are four section exams which correspond to the four units taught during the semester.

Required Text

Economics. Twentieth Edition. Campbell R. McConnell, Stanley L. Brue, and Sean M. Flynn. McGraw Hill, 2015.

Required Materials

Required Activities

Specific Course Activity Assignment or Assessment Requirements

Journals/Quizzes There are a total of fifteen journals/quizzes throughout the semester. The journals may be a response to an article, exercises from the text, or assignment on any topic related to the course. Quizzes are based upon information covered in each respective chapter. Term Paper or Guest Speaker Paper Students are required to either write a term paper in response to an economic article or attend a guest speaker and write a paper on how they were able to apply economic concepts to what was discussed. Exams There are four section exams which correspond to the four units taught during the semester. 1. 2.