MATH 123 Math in Modern Society*

This survey course provides an opportunity to acquire an appreciation of the nature of mathematics and its relation to other aspects of our culture. The course is rigorous but not rigid and applies mathematics to real-world problems.

Credits

3 Credits

Prerequisite

MATH 023 with a grade of 'C' or better, or CSI placement test score

MATH 123Math in Modern Society*

Please note: This is not a course syllabus. A course syllabus is unique to a particular section of a course by instructor. This curriculum guide provides general information about a course.

I. General Information

Department

Mathematics & Engineering

II. Course Specification

General Education Competency

GEM Mathematical Way of Knowing

Credit Hours Narrative

3 Credits

Semester Contact Hours Lecture

45

Prerequisite Narrative

MATH 023 with a grade of 'C' or better, or CSI placement test score

Grading Method

Letter grade

Repeatable

N

III. Catalog Course Description

This survey course provides an opportunity to acquire an appreciation of the nature of mathematics and its relation to other aspects of our culture. The course is rigorous but not rigid and applies mathematics to real-world problems.

IV. Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, a student will be able to:

The student will learn and apply the principles of inductive and deductive reasoning when solving skill-based and authentic problems that apply to their lives. The student will learn the fundamentals of set theory and apply that knowledge to the classification and organization of information to solve real-world problems. The student will learn about the real number system and apply that knowledge to solve algebraic equations, inequalities, and functions. The student will learn the basics of consumer mathematics, such as sales tax, income tax, simple and compound interest and apply that knowledge to solve problems involving income tax, installment loans, amortization, and credit cards. The student will learn about the English and Metric measurement systems. They will use that knowledge and dimensional analysis to change units of measurement within a system as well as to a different system. Using both systems, they will also solve authentic problems that apply to their lives.

V. Topical Outline (Course Content)

Critical thinking (inductive and deductive reasoning, estimation) Problem solving (understand the problem, devise a plan, carry out the plan, check the answer) Number theory (prime numbers, composite numbers, divisibility, greatest common divisor, least common multiple) Operations with integers (order of operations, using number lines, absolute value, adding, subtracting, multiplying, dividing, using inequality symbols) Operations with rational numbers (reducing fractions, changing fractions to decimals, changing decimals to fractions, adding and subtracting fractions) Operations with irrational numbers (simplify, multiply, add, subtract, and rationalize expressions with square roots) Expressions with exponents (use positive and negative exponents, write and use scientific notation) Real numbers (classify, identify properties) Ratios and proportions (solve) Quadratic equations (solve by factoring and using quadratic formula) Graphs of ordered pairs and equations Functions (evaluate, graph, use vertical line test, analyze the graph of a function to gather information) Linear functions (find intercepts, calculate slope, graph, interpret slope and intercepts in applied problems) Quadratic functions (graph, find vertex and intercepts, solve application problems) Systems of linear equations (solve systems having two variables) Consumer mathematics and financial management (percent, income tax calculations, simple and compound interest, installment buying, mortgages and the cost of home ownership) Measurement in metrics (length, area, volume, weight, temperature) Geometry (perimeter, area, circumference, volume, right triangle trigonometry) Statistics (central tendencies, dispersion) In addition, students will study part or all of the following additional concepts and processes, to be determined by each individual instructor: Number systems (our Hindu-Arabic system, early positional systems, converting to number bases other than ten) Logic (statements, negations, quantified statements, compound statements, connectives, truth tables, conditional and bi-conditional statements, arguments) Computations in bases other than base ten Exponential functions (graph, solve application problems) Early numeration systems (Egyptian, Roman, Chinese, Greek) Arithmetic and geometric sequences Linear inequalities (one variable, two variables, linear programming) Probability Set theory (basic set concepts, Venn diagrams, subsets, intersection, union) OR Counting methods (determine the number of possible outcomes, count permutations, count combinations)

VI. Delivery Methodologies

Required Exams

Final Exam

Specific Course Activity Assignment or Assessment Requirements

Final Exam