BUSA 207 Business Statistics for Decision Making I*

This course is designed to provide students with a fundamental understanding of statistical processes and techniques commonly used in today’s business arena. Using practical applications and problem-solving, students will develop a basic understanding of statistics and its impact and uses in business. Students will develop a working knowledge of such topics as frequency distributions, measures of central tendency and dispersion, probability, normal distribution, sampling methods, estimation and hypothesis testing. Computer competency is strongly advised.

Credits

3 Credits

Prerequisite

BUSA 215 and MATH 043 or equivalent placement score

BUSA 207Business Statistics for Decision Making I*

Please note: This is not a course syllabus. A course syllabus is unique to a particular section of a course by instructor. This curriculum guide provides general information about a course.

I. General Information

Department

II. Course Specification

Course Type

Program Requirement

Credit Hours Narrative

3 Credits

Semester Contact Hours Lecture

50

Semester Contact Hours Lab

0

Semester Contact Hours Clinical

0

Prerequisite Narrative

BUSA 215 and MATH 043 or equivalent placement score

Repeatable

N

III. Catalog Course Description

This course is designed to provide students with a fundamental understanding of statistical processes and techniques commonly used in today’s business arena. Using practical applications and problem-solving, students will develop a basic understanding of statistics and its impact and uses in business. Students will develop a working knowledge of such topics as frequency distributions, measures of central tendency and dispersion, probability, normal distribution, sampling methods, estimation and hypothesis testing. Computer competency is strongly advised.

IV. Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, a student will be able to:

V. Topical Outline (Course Content)

The course consists of four units, each with its own exam, as well as a team project as a class final (see Section VI): Unit 1: Chapter 1: The Where, Why, and How of Data Collection Chapter 2: Graphs, Charts, and Tables--Describing Your Data Chapter 3: Describing Data Using Numerical Measures Unit 2: Chapter 4: Introduction to Probability Chapter 5: Discrete Probability Distributions Chapter 6: Introduction to Continuous Probability Distributions Unit 3: Chapter 7: Introduction to Sampling Distributions Chapter 8: Estimating Single Population Parameters Unit 4: Chapter 9: Introduction to Hypothesis Testing Chapter 10: Estimation and Hypothesis Testing for Two Population Parameters

VI. Delivery Methodologies

Required Exams

Exams There are four section exams worth one hundred 100 points each. The exams are not comprehensive; each exam only pertains to information covered since the previous exam. The exams are individual effort only and contain true/false, multiple choice, and short answer items which may involve calculations and/or interpretation of statistical results. Students are allowed to use a single, one-sided sheet of handwritten or typed notes for each exam. Students are also required to use a basic calculator during exams; no graphing calculators or the like are allowed.

Specific Course Activity Assignment or Assessment Requirements

Homework There are a total of eleven homework assignments throughout the semester. Each homework assignment is worth 20 points, and students are allotted one "free" homework (students may drop the lowest homework score). Team Project Working in groups of two or three, students are required to find, review, interpret and present a business-related research article to the class. Each team presents their article to the class during finals week in a 10-15 minute presentation. Teams also are required to turn in a 5-7 page paper that discusses the article and should reflect analytical thinking and application of course material in interpreting the methods of the study, as well as what the results mean for real-world business applications. The project is worth one hundred 100 points: 50 points for the presentation and 50 points for the paper. Exams There are four section exams worth one hundred 100 points each. The exams are not comprehensive; each exam only pertains to information covered since the previous exam. The exams are individual effort only and contain true/false, multiple choice, and short answer items which may involve calculations and/or interpretation of statistical results. Students are allowed to use a single, one-sided sheet of handwritten or typed notes for each exam. Students are also required to use a basic calculator during exams; no graphing calculators or the like are allowed. 1. 2.