CRIJ 275 Criminal Evidence Law

This course presents the law and rules of evidence, burden of proof, exclusionary rule, presumption, opinion evidence, and leading court cases involving the presentation and acceptability of evidence. Witness examination procedures and related legal problems are presented.

Credits

3 Credits

CRIJ 275Criminal Evidence Law

Please note: This is not a course syllabus. A course syllabus is unique to a particular section of a course by instructor. This curriculum guide provides general information about a course.

I. General Information

Department

Social Science

II. Course Specification

Course Type

Program Requirement

Credit Hours Narrative

3 Credits

Semester Contact Hours Lecture

48

Grading Method

Letter grade

Repeatable

N

III. Catalog Course Description

This course presents the law and rules of evidence, burden of proof, exclusionary rule, presumption, opinion evidence, and leading court cases involving the presentation and acceptability of evidence. Witness examination procedures and related legal problems are presented.

IV. Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, a student will be able to:

Analyze the role of evidence in the court adjudication process. Examine the concepts of relevant, material, and competent evidence. Distinguish and examine circumstantial and direct evidence. Analyze the purposes and history of the hearsay rule. Define hearsay and explain the application of the rule to evidence. Identify and explain the exceptions to the hearsay rule. Define impeachment and analyze the impeachment process as it relates to excluded evidence. Analyze the effect of character and reputation evidence on the adjudication process. Examine and discuss the rationale for privileged communications. Analyze and describe the role of the judge and jury in evaluating evidence. Examine and evaluate the role and qualification of expert witnesses. Define and analyze the exclusionary rule and the rules impact on the admissibility of evidence. Identify and explain the exceptions to the exclusionary rule. Distinguish and analyze real and demonstrative evidence. Analyze and apply the law governing identification evidence. Discuss the problems associated with the handling of physical and trace evidence in the adjudication process. Define scientific evidence and discuss the law regarding the admissibility of scientific evidence.

V. Topical Outline (Course Content)

History and Development of the Law of Criminal Evidence Important Aspects of the American Criminal Justice System Using Evidence to Determine Guilt or Innocence Direct and Circumstantial Evidence and the Use of Inferences Witnesses and the Testimony of Witnesses Judicial Notice, Privileges of Witnesses, and Shield Laws The Use of Hearsay in the Courtroom The Confrontation Clause and Exceptions to the Hearsay Rule The Exclusionary Rule Where the Exclusionary Rule Does Not Apply "Special Needs" and Administrative Searchers Obtaining Statements and Confessions for Use as Evidence The Law Governing Identification Evidence Obtaining Physical and Other Evidence Obtaining Evidence by Use of Search Warrants, from Computers, Wiretapping, or Dogs Trained to Indicate an Alert The Crime Scene, the Chain of Custody Requirement, and the Use of Fingerprint and Trace Evidence Videotapes, Photographs, Documents, and Writings as Evidence Scientific Evidence

VI. Delivery Methodologies

Required Assignments

Participation in classroom discussion and activity Chapter readings and written summaries of main topics

Required Exams

Chapter Quizzes Unit Exams

Required Text

Criminal Evidence Principles and Cases, By Thomas Gardner and Terry Anderson (9th Edition, Cengage Learning)

Specific Course Activity Assignment or Assessment Requirements

Participation in classroom discussion and activity Chapter readings and written summaries of main topics Chapter Quizzes Unit Exams