ANTH 104 Introduction to Biological Anthropology

This course will provide a general overview of the discipline of biological anthropology including evolutionary theory, genetics and population genetics, taxonomy, living primates, primate evolution, hominin origins, and modern human variations and adaptation.   ANTH 104 focuses on the multi-disciplinary and multi-cultural nature of anthropology and satisfies Scientific Way of Knowing General Education requirements for CSI.  
 

Credits

3 Credits

General Education Competency

Scientific Way of Knowing

ANTH 104Introduction to Biological Anthropology

Please note: This is not a course syllabus. A course syllabus is unique to a particular section of a course by instructor. This curriculum guide provides general information about a course.

I. General Information

Department

Social Science Academic

II. Course Specification

Course Type

{5B2306C7-58E4-43D4-B8A5-26C59F89A734}

General Education Competency

Scientific Way of Knowing

Credit Hours Narrative

3 Credits

Semester Contact Hours Lecture

45

Semester Contact Hours Lab

0

Semester Contact Hours Clinical

0

Repeatable

No

III. Catalog Course Description

This course will provide a general overview of the discipline of biological anthropology including evolutionary theory, genetics and population genetics, taxonomy, living primates, primate evolution, hominin origins, and modern human variations and adaptation.   ANTH 104 focuses on the multi-disciplinary and multi-cultural nature of anthropology and satisfies Scientific Way of Knowing General Education requirements for CSI.  
 

IV. Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, a student will be able to:

  • Understand and apply the scientific method by formulating and testing hypotheses, analyzing and predicting phenomena, and effectively communicating experimental results.
  • Explain the distinction between a scientific and pseudoscientific explanation of phenomena.
  • Understand principles of genetic inheritance and evolution by natural selection
  • Analyze genetic variation using the Hardy-Weinberg principle
  • Understand modern human variation and bio-cultural approach to human development.
  • Understand primate taxonomic classification, comparative primate anatomy, and social behavior
  • Interpret hominin evolutionary history; with emphasis on bipedalism, tool technology, language, and behavioral adaptations in response to environmental change.
  • Evaluate the cultural, physiological, population, and environmental consequences of agriculture.

V. Topical Outline (Course Content)

Introduction: What is Biological Anthropology

The Scientific Theory of Evolution

Genetics: Reproducing Life and Producing Variation

Genes and Population Genetics

Biology in the Present: Living People

Biology in the Present: Other Living Primates

Fossils and Their Place in Time

Primate Origins and Evolution: The First 50 million Years

Early Hominin Origins and Evolution: The Roots of Humanity

The Origins and Evolution of Early Homo

The Origins, Evolution, and Dispersal of Modern People

Our Last 10,000 Years: Agriculture, Population, Biology

 

VI. Delivery Methodologies

Specific Course Activity Assignment or Assessment Requirements

Genetics lab: Hardy-Weinberg Principle

Diet Analysis Project

Non-human primate comparative anatomy lab

Bipedal lab